Funding + Safe Routes to Transit + Safe Routes to School + Regional Transportation Plan + Metropolitan Transportation Commission + Caltrans

Learn About BABC's Advocacy Platform

 Sign up to support the BABC Platform for MTC's Regional Transportation   Planand Sustainable Communities Strategy.

  Every 4 years, MTC plans transportation investments for the region and   we need your help to increase Safe Routes to School funding, strengthen Complete Streets policies, reserve a percentage of One Bay Area grant projects for stand-alone bicycle pedestrian projects, and mprove modeling and data collection. 

For more information, click here

Sustainable Communities Strategy

Sign up to support the BABC Platform for MTC's Regional Transportation Plan and Sustainable Communities Strategy.  Every 4 years, MTC plans transportation investments for the region and we need your help to:

- Increase Safe Routes to School funding

- Strengthen Complete Streets policies

- Reserve a percentage of One Bay Area grant projects for stand-alone bicycle pedestrian projects

- Improve modeling and data collection

 

Download the full BABC platform here.

Download our latest letter to MTC on SCS here.

New Jobs Bill Could Bring Millions for Bikes

The Federal Jobs Bill H.R. 2847 has passed the House and is now being discussed in the Senate.  The bill is poised to be enacted early in 2010, bringing an expected $2.5 billion in transportation funding to California with an estimated $150-$300 million in highway money coming to the Bay Area.

According to Title 23 Chapter 1 Section 133 of the U.S. Code: Bike Projects are eligible for this highway funding.

"(3) Carpool projects, fringe and corridor parking facilities and programs, bicycle transportation and pedestrian walkways in accordance with section 217, and the modification of public sidewalks to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq.)."

On January 13th, MTC’s Programming and Allocations Committee will be discussing the guiding principles for how this money will be used throughout the 9-county Bay Area region. Here is MTC's current proposal (pdf).

BABC is working with Urban Habitat and TransForm to affect these principles and to make sure that bicycle infrastructure is set up for significant funding.  Here is a copy of our letter to MTC regarding use of the Jobs Bill funds.

We are compiling a list of bike projects ready for funding that this new bill could support.  We will update this list as we hear from more cities and counties.  If you know of a bike project that is ready to be funded in your county, please contact babc@bayareabikes.org

Bike Projects Ready for Funding in the Bay Area (updated 1/11/10)

  1. Alamo Canal Trail I-580: Part of the Regional Bike Network, Currently undergoing federal environmental review and thus shovel ready
  2. SF Bay Trail at Hercules Transit Center: Part of the Regional Bike Network
  3. West County Bay Trail San Pablo: In Regional Bike Network, Has already completed federal environmental review
  4. Maud Ave Sidewalk Improvement
  5. Grove Way Sidewalk Improvement
  6. Marshall/Omega Sidewalk Improvement
  7. Buchanan Bicycle and Pedestrian Path Project
  8. Pedestrian Safety Corridor Improvement Project, which includes:
    1. University Avenue Corridor Pedestrian Safety Improvements (6th Street to San Pablo Ave)
    2. Ashby BART Station Area Improvements
    3. Ashby Avenue Corridor Pedestrian Safety Improvements (San Pablo Ave to California)
    4. Shattuck Avenue Corridor Pedestrian Safety Improvements (Hearst to Vine)
    5. San Pablo Avenue Corridor Pedestrian Safety Improvements (Addison to Bancroft)
  9. Cedar Street Sidewalk Improvement Project
  10. Mission Boulevard Sidewalk Improvement Project
  11. Iron Horse Trail, Isabel Avenue to Murrieta Bl.
  12. Trail improvements Segment N (LARPD Project managed by City of Livermore)

Letter to MTC on Jobs Bill

January 8, 2010

Dear Chair Haggerty and MTC Commissioners,

As you know, the House has passed HR 2847, a “Jobs Bill”, which would include at least $550 million in transportation funding for the Bay Area. Information about this legislation will be presented to the Programming and Allocations Committee this coming Wednesday (January 13, 2010). As MTC prepares to be able to spend these funds quickly, we urge you to use the following four principles, described in detail below, to guide the investment of these new funds: maximize job creation, support focused growth, fix it for all, and maximize funding flexibility.

 ·        Maximize job creation. The paramount purpose of this legislation is to create jobs. MTC should use current information about job creation to direct new federal Jobs Bill funding to maximize job creation. For example, a recently released study from Smart Growth America, What We Learned from the Stimulus, reports that ARRA funds spent on public transportation more effectively created jobs than stimulus funds spent on highway projects—Dollar for dollar, transit projects funded by the stimulus created twice as many jobs per dollar as investing in roads.  In addition to creating jobs, investment in public transportation preserves jobs by enabling people to continue to get to work reliably. As you know, many of the Bay Area’s transit agencies are in the process of cutting services and raising fares, adding additional affordability pressure and access challenges to many Bay Area commuters who are struggling to retain their jobs. Additionally, the League of American Bicyclists have found that for every $1 million invested in an FHWA-approved paved bicycle or multi-use trail, the local economy gains 65 jobs.

·        Support focused growth. As the Bay Area steps up to the challenge of SB 375 and successful adoption of the region’s first Sustainable Community Strategy, we should take advantage of new funding to support the goals of our future SCS: to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, support focused growth, and preserve and expand access for all. MTC should consider how these funds may support eligible PDA needs, for example, by directing funds to the TLC program to achieve the goal of $60 million/year for this program, and/or by prioritizing grants to support cities’ transportation projects within planned PDAs.

 ·        Fix it for all: There are countless streets in the Bay Area that do not meet identified standards for pedestrian and bicycle access and safety. At the same time, the region’s local streets and roads (LS&R) face huge maintenance shortfalls. When MTC adopted its Complete Streets (also called Routine Accommodation) policy, the expectation was that the region and local municipalities would be partners in ensuring that regional funds be spent on projects that meet standards for pedestrian and bicycle access and improve and enhance this access. MTC should follow through on this intention by using these Jobs Funds efficiently by funding only those LS&R maintenance projects that also address bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure improvements that create truly complete streets. There are shovel-ready segments of the Regional Bike Network throughout the nine counties. For instance, MTC could fund implementation of shovel-ready segments of the Regional Bicycle Network or Countywide Bicycle Plans that overlap with local streets and roads maintenance projects, lessening the maintenance shortfall while investing in a legacy of a complete active transportation network.

·        Maximize Flexibility of Fund Sources: To achieve the region’s goals for a healthy, livable, affordable Bay Area and to fulfill the previously outlined principles, it is tremendously important for MTC to use federal funding as flexibly as possible. For instance, there are FHWA funds that the region does not traditionally use for transit purposes, but that may legally be used this way. Similarly, although 10% of federal FHWA funds go to Transportation Enhancements, bicycle and pedestrian projects, programs that facilitate non-automobile travel, provision and utilization of mass transit and other traffic control measures are all eligible expenses for the remainder of FHWA funds as well under federal law.

Thank you for your consideration of these principles. We welcome your questions and would be happy to discuss all or any of these with you.

 Sincerely,

 Bob Allen, Urban Habitat

Andrew Casteel, Bay Area Bicycle Coalition

Stephanie Reyes, Greenbelt Alliance

Carli Paine, TransForm

2035 Regional Transportation Plan

Transportation planning agencies around the nine-county Bay Area planned ways to improve and change the way we will get around in the next 25 years.  New tunnels, larger train networks, more ferries, road rehab, highway projects, new bike facilities and pedestrian accommodations are all on the table for consideration during the revision of MTC’s Regional Transportation Plan.

This process and document, known as the “RTP” or “T2035 Plan,” articulates a 25 year vision for getting around in the Bay Area. The RTP decides $100 BILLION+ in regional transportation investments and is one of the major opportunities the public has to shape how the Bay Area will grow and travel.  This blueprint is revised every four years.

Download a copy of the T2035 plan from the MTC website.

BABC worked together with local bicycle coalitions and TransForm to advocate for increased funding for sustainable transportation.  Working together, our coalition managed to secure several important wins:

A Billion for Bikes
The greatest success for bikes was a huge increase in regional bicycle funding, with the regional commitment increasing 5-fold from $200 Million to $1 Billion dollars over the next 25 years.  This money will fund the Regional Bikeway Network, a 2100 Mile network of bike facilities connecting all the counties in the Bay Area and providing better bicycle access to transit stations.

A Commitment to Climate
The RTP includes a promise of $400 Million dollars to a 5 year Climate Initiative aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions by encouraging sustainable transportation.  Included in this program is funding for Safe Routes to School and Safe Routes to Transit.

Building Livable Communities
Over $2 Billion dollars in funding over the next 25 years is promised to the Transportation for Livable Communities (TLC) program which encourages Transit Oriented Development by improving bicycle and pedestrian access to transit stations.  This is double the funding TLC received in the 2030 RTP.

The fight for regional funding for bikes is far from over.  While the RTP is intended to guide funding decisions for the region, MTC still has the flexibility to choose how funds are distributed among the programs defined in the RTP.  BABC will continue to work with our allies in monitoring funding proposals from MTC to ensure that these commitments in the RTP are fulfilled.  Follow the Funding section of BABC's website for updates on our advocacy on bike funding for the Bay Area.

These wins wouldn't have been possible without your letters, public comments and financial support.  We would like to thank everyone who supported our efforts to secure more funding for bikes in the RTP.  Please support BABC so that we can continue to build a better future for bicycling in the Bay Area.

BABC and Allies Secure $192 Million in Funding for Sustainable Transportation

Thanks to the efforts of the BABC, local bike coalitions, TransForm and the Greenbelt Alliance, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) approved $192 Million in STP/CMAQ funding for sustainable transportation over the next 3 years, $48 Million more than MTC’s initial proposal for those funds.

The $192 Million in Sustainable Transportation funding will go to the following programs:

CLIMATE INITIATIVES
A series of innovative grant and outreach programs aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from transportation.  This includes $17 Million in funding for the first regional Safe Routes to School (SR2S) program in the country, which provides funding for education and bike infrastructure to encourage students to bike and walk safely to school.

REGIONAL BICYCLE PROGRAM

Funds the Regional Bicycle Network (RBN), a 2,100 mile regional network of bike routes providing connections between counties and between major transit hubs and business and retail centers throughout the region.

TRANSPORTATION FOR LIVABLE COMMUNITIES (TLC)

Provides Transit and Capital Funds to improve Pedestrian, Bicycle and Transit Access.   TLC encourages Transit Oriented Development, which helps create communities that make it easier to use non-motorized transportation.

We couldn’t have done any of this without the support of all of you who wrote their MTC commissioners demanding that funding for these important programs be increased.  We would like to thank everyone who wrote a letter, signed our petition or gave public comment.  Your support is the most powerful tool in the fight for a better future for biking, walking and transit.

While this increase in funding was a great win, we still have several challenges ahead of us.  Even with the increased funding these programs received, they are still not funded at the levels promised in the regional transportation plan adopted by MTC this year.  Funding for Safe Routes to Transit (SR2T) is limited to evaluation only, despite the hundreds of you who signed our petition to fund SR2T.  The Federal Transportation Act could see a major overhaul this year, changing the way this STP/CMAQ funding is allotted, possibly providing more opportunities for funding bicycle and pedestrian improvements that encourage sustainable transportation.

BABC Successfully Advocates for $17 Million in Regional Safe Routes to School Funding

BABC successfully advocated for MTC to start the first regional Safe Routes to School (SR2S) program as part of their Climate Initiative.  Working with our partner agencies, Transform and Greenbelt Alliance as well as our local coalitions, BABC secured $17 Million in STP/CMAQ funds for SR2S for 2010-2012.  MTC is currently developing the guidelines for their regional Safe Routes to School Program.  We will post a link to the guidelines for this new program as soon as they are available.

 

BABC will continue to work with MTC in their stakeholder committee that is putting together the guidelines that will shape SR2S programs in all of the 9 counties in the Bay Area.

 

Help Save Safe Routes to Transit

Downtown Berkeley BART Bike Station is being expanded with SR2T funds.  Click here to see what other projects are being funded by SR2T.
Downtown Berkeley BART Bike Station
See More SR2T projects

The Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) adopted by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) in April 2009 promised $50 Million each in funding over the next 5 years for Safe Routes to Transit (SR2T) and Safe Routes to School (SRTS) as part of their Climate Action Plan.  However, in MTC’s recent proposal for programming federal funding, they have limited their funding for SR2T to evaluation of the program with no money to continue to build improvements to ensure safe and easy access to regional transit.

It is unacceptable to completely eliminate funding for such an important program as Safe Routes to Transit that was promised to the public in the RTP. We need your help to ensure that MTC invests in making transit safer and easier for bikes and pedestrians to access.  Heres what you can do:


Sign the Safe Routes to Transit Petition

Show MTC that there is strong demand for safer access to TransitClick Here to Sign

Share Your Ideas for Making Your Transit Commute Safer
Next time you are walking or biking to transit and you see something that could be made safer or easier to navigate, let us know where it is and how Safe Routes to Transit funds could help fix it, take a picture if you can and then share it with us in one of the following ways.  We'll be presenting all the responses we get to MTC's December 9th meeting to help make the case for funding Safe Routes to Transit.

Speak Up In Favor of Safe Routes to Transit at MTC December 9th
Join us in voicing your support for safer and easier access to transit at the December 9th Programming and Allocations Meeting at MTC. For more information contact Andrew Casteel at 415.814.9247 or savesr2t@bayareabikes.org.

Come to MTC on December 9th to help Save Safe Routes to Transit

Downtown Berkeley BART Bike Station is being expanded with SR2T funds.  Click here to see what other projects are being funded by SR2T.
Downtown Berkeley BART Bike Station
See More SR2T projects

The Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) adopted by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) in April 2009 promised $50 Million each in funding over the next 5 years for Safe Routes to Transit (SR2T) and Safe Routes to School (SRTS) as part of their Climate Action Plan.  However, in MTC’s recent proposal for programming federal funding, they have limited their funding for SR2T to evaluation of the program with no money to continue to build improvements to ensure safe and easy access to regional transit.

It is unacceptable to completely eliminate funding for such an important program as Safe Routes to Transit that was promised to the public in the RTP. We need your help to ensure that MTC invests in making transit safer and easier for bikes and pedestrians to access.  Heres what you can do:

Speak Up In Favor of Safe Routes to Transit at MTC December 9th
Join us in voicing your support for safer and easier access to transit at the December 9th Programming and Allocations Meeting at MTC. For more information contact Andrew Casteel at 415.814.9247 or savesr2t@bayareabikes.org.

If You Can't Come to the Meeting, Share Your Ideas for Making Your Transit Commute Safer
Next time you are walking or biking to transit and you see something that could be made safer or easier to navigate, let us know where it is and how Safe Routes to Transit funds could help fix it, take a picture if you can and then share it with us in one of the following ways.  We'll be presenting all the responses we get to MTC's December 9th meeting to help make the case for funding Safe Routes to Transit.

Thank you to everyone who signed our Safe Routes to Transit Petition
We've shown MTC that there is great demand for these funds.  Click Here to View

Safe Routes to Transit Projects

Safe Routes to Transit has already provided many improvements to the safety and ease of bike and pedestrian access to transit.  Here are a few:

Already Built

Richmond/Ohlone Greenway

The Richmond/Ohlone Greenway represents a regional route connecting the cities of Richmond, El Cerrito and Berkeley. It provides safe and easy access to many AC Transit and BART stations, passing near Richmond BART and three schools. It will also connect three major East Bay bikeways, the Bay Trail, the Ohlone Greenway and the I-80 Bikeway, which travels north to the Rodeo Transit Center.

San Francisco 16th St. BART Bicycle Stair Channel

This ramp allows cyclists to push rather than carry their bikes up three flights of stairs. This takes weight off cyclists shoulders and is safer for all transit users, reducing the risk of dropping a bike or accidently hitting others on the stairs.

 

Coming Soon

Puerto Suello Hill Pathway

This project provides safe pedestrian and bicycle access to the San Rafael Transit Center. It connects the Puerto Suello Hill Pathway which ends at the intersection of Mission Avenue and Hetherton Avenue to the San Rafael Transit Center.

 

Bike Station at Berkeley BART

The bike station at the Downtown Berkeley BART station will be expanded. The new bike station will be located in the now-vacant Shoe Pavilion store on Shattuck. It will replace the current station, which is inside the BART station. It will provide free attended bike parking for 200 bikes, bicycle repair, bicycle rentals, showers and lockers, and community bike education classes. For more information visit http://sf.streetsblog.org/2009/06/12/expanded-downtown-berkeley-bart-bike-station-moving-forward/

   

 

Planned with Funding from Safe Routes

   

New BART Test Cars

Design plans for the new cars include a space designated for bicycles including a bar which allows cyclists to strap the bikes down. There will be more room for additional passengers, bikes and luggage. There is also possibility of upgrading them with new technology for customer communication, new interior fabrics and colors, and new modular seat configurations. Visit http://www.bart.gov/about/projects/cars/index.aspx for more information.

 

 Mission and Geneva Pedestrian Improvements

The neighborhood will be transformed into a corridor with a landscape buffer along London Street. Traffic-calming measures will be installed to slow speeding cars. Improved curbs and bus stops for pedestrians will also be installed. Amenities to make the area safer will be added such as countdown traffic signals and improved street lighting. Bus stops will be combined to make it easier for riders to connect to BART. For more information visit http://www.sfcta.org/content/view/310/157/

Pleasant Hill BART/Contra Costa Centre Shortcut Path and Wayfinding System Project

The purpose of this project is to make the area around the BART station friendlier to pedestrians and bicyclists, and to improve access to and from the BART station. One of the projects added was the extension of a Pedestrian Promenade from the BART station
to neighborhoods northeast of the station. The Shortcut Path will improve on local transportation options and improve access to community amenities. For more information visit http://www.co.contra-costa.ca.us/depart/cd/transportation/phb_path/announcements.htm

Balboa Park Ocean Avenue Pedestrian/Bicycle Connections

Some of the proposed improvements include improving safety while increasing access by reducing collisions, upgrading street lighting, landscaping and street furniture, and improved directional signage in and around the station. Expected results are a major improvement to pedestrian and bicyclist comfort and safety, better end-to-end transit experience for pedestrians and cyclists and increased transit ridership and rider retention. For more information visit http://www.sfmta.com/cms/obalboa/balboaindx.htm

 

 

 

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