EBBC Announces 2010 Bike-Friendly Business Award Winners (Oakland Local)

To list all Bay Area bicycle friendly businesses, one would need to employ a device used by Jack Kerouac – the scroll. Area leaders who care about cycling also tend to care about liveable neighborhoods, being design-minded and creative, and getting things done through grit and gumption. Plans and profits don’t suffer in the process. The winners not only meet the basic EBBC criteria such as providing secure bike parking, EBBC maps, pre-tax bicycle commuter checks, and discounts for cyclists. They also celebrate Bike to Work Day every day by encouraging lunchtime rides, showering at the office, conducting workshops, promoting safety, and including spandex as a new option for casual Fridays. Read more...

 

 

San Francisco Planners Proud of Long List of Road Diets (SF Streetsblog)

Although there is no record book for the cities with the most traffic-calmed streets, San Francisco planners believe their city has the most road diets, or roads that have had auto lanes narrowed or removed to calm traffic speeds and provide room for other modes of travel. The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (MTA) has instituted 34 road diets since the city's Transit First policy was adopted in 1973, a number that is expected to grow once the bicycle injunction is lifted and new bike lanes are striped. Read more...

 

 

How Quickly Will Caltrans Embrace Complete Streets Guidelines? (SF Streetsblog)

Though it may seem esoteric, one of the biggest impediments to designing streets for people is the over-reliance on design standards that have long privileged movement of vehicles over any other consideration on the streets. That's why advocates cheered when U.S. DOT Secretary Ray LaHood published a policy paper recently that, at least in word, placed bicycles and pedestrians on equal footing with motorists. "Every transportation agency, including DOT, has the responsibility to improve conditions and opportunities for walking and bicycling and to integrate walking and bicycling into their transportation systems," read one line of the statement. Read more...

Surveys seek input on transit needs (SF Examiner)

Think your neighborhood could use expanded bus service, an intercommunity shuttle or improvements to transportation shelters? One Peninsula community could get all those upgrades and more. San Mateo and SamTrans are seeking community input from residents in the north-central neighborhood of the city to share the potential transportation improvements that could be brought to the area. Read more...

 

Bay Bridge Bicycle-Pedestrian-Maintenance Pathway Hearing March 23rd

On March 23rd 2010 the CA State Senate Transportation and Housing Committee will vote on SB 1061, whether to allow funding for the west-span Bay Bridge bicycle-pedestrian-maintenance pathway. You can help by sending a letter your legislator to support SB 1061. Read more...

 

Watch this video for more information on the need for bicycle/pedestrian access across the bay and how you can help.

 

Vine Trail from Vallejo to Calistoga in the works (Times-Herald)

If he gets his way, Napa Valley Vine Trail Coalition Executive Director Chuck McMinn will help create the Vine Trail to increase public safety, interconnect with existing public transportation thereby increasing ridership, and provide "regional connectivity to the nine Bay Area counties," he said. If it happens, the Vine Trail would become one of three trail projects circling the San Francisco Bay. It likely will take a decade, but a Napa-based group is already working toward creating a hike/bike trail from the Vallejo Ferry Terminal to Calistoga. Read more...

 

Marin snapshot: Executive director of Marin County Bicycle Coalition rides a rewarding path (Marin Independent Journal)

Baenisch, 43, grew up on Long Island, N.Y., where she noted the "square footage of shopping malls greatly exceeds the area provided for bike lanes and paths." The Fairfax resident has a bachelor's degree in landscape architecture from Cornell University. Kim Baenisch has been the executive director for the Marin County Bicycle Coalition since March 2005. The organization has been working to improve the county's roads and paths for walkers and bikers since it was formed in 1998. Read more...

 

Trailblazers: How Bicycle Advocates Defined North American Cycling Culture (Momentum Magazine)

If you spend much time pedaling the streets of any city in North America, you’re probably pretty passionate about it. You know what it’s like to be part of a small and all-too-often embattled minority – and you probably also believe the world would be a better place if a lot more people got out of their cars and joined you on bikes. These simple feelings have given rise to an increasingly sophisticated bike advocacy movement that has grown across the US and Canada over the last four decades. Cycling, once seen as only suitable for children and oddly attired athletes, is now becoming a mainstream form of transportation in cities from San Francisco to New York, from Montreal to Vancouver, BC. Read more...

Study calls for skinnier roads, more room for other travel on El Camino Real (Mercury News)

Imagine an El Camino Real with roomier sidewalks, narrower traffic lanes and more space for bicyclists, pedestrians and buses. A new report on the future of state Highway 82 from Daly City to San Jose sees just that vision for the pivotal 42-mile stretch, which is known as The Alameda in San Jose. But because of challenges posed by crammed corridors, funding shortages and differences among cities, it will likely take years for travelers to notice any upgrades. The state Department of Transportation, the counties of San Mateo and Santa Clara and planning consultants released the 119-page report in mid-February as part of the Grand Boulevard Initiative. Read more...

Big ideas sought for Oakland Bay Bridge park (SF Chronicle)

It's a good bet that few drivers crossing the Bay Bridge pay attention to where it touches down in Oakland - a smear of maintenance yards and parking, stray buildings and scrub. But with the new eastern span of the bridge scheduled to open in 2013, government planners are floating the idea of a much different role for the 1.5-mile-long strip: a park that would celebrate the bridge and the region, with attractions scaled to the immense cranes of the nearby Port of Oakland. There's no design and no budget - yet. The public process is only now getting under way. Read more...

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